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Doreen Garner: Doctor’s Hours

October 8 – November 10, 2017

Larrie presents Well Adjusted, Hayley Martell’s first solo exhibition with the gallery. The show consists of new works by the artist: sculptures incorporating weaving, clay, and plexiglass, as well as video, graphite drawings, and one interactive piece. The exhibition opens October 8, 2017.

Larrie NYC presents Well Adjusted, Hayley Martell’s first solo exhibition with the gallery. The show consists of new works by the artist: sculptures incorporating weaving, clay, and plexiglass, as well as video, graphite drawings, and one interactive piece. All come rooted in the concept of healing by re-contextualizing the objects associated with trauma. Martell has created the sculptures in this show by drawing inspiration from familial stories of feminine strength, sacrifice, and the humor needed to overcome intergenerational grief. The drawings are visual representations of one’s inner struggle to reach emotional homeostasis. Well Adjusted utilizes a non-linear narrative structure to offer insight into the mind of someone affected by PTSD. This show recognizes and honors the people and places who help one adjust.

Hayley Martell [b. 1990] is a New York-based artist whose work investigates gender performativity, behavioral psychology, and linguistics. She utilizes the mediums of sculpture, video, sound, and drawing to creates submersive experiences for her audiences. These installations aim to evoke feelings of introspection, serenity, and curiosity while utilizing subtle humor to establish a sense of safety for her viewer. Martell completed her BFA at the Maryland College Institute of Art in 2012. Her work has been exhibited internationally, including presentations at MAW Gallery, Otion Front Studio, Glasshouse Artlifelab, SIGNAL, and on Rhizome.org.

Bluestone also tests rules of taste and conventions of style. Frequently containing hues from every section of the color wheel, the paintings transgress art school rules to flirt with the unrefined. Bluestone underlays her vivid jewel-tone palette with a ground of pearlescent paint that adds a shimmer to the compositions and a luminescence to the figures, but also toys with the association of glitteriness and tackiness. By constructing bodies and faces from pools and strokes of tempered paint, Bluestone muddles the distinction between abstraction and figuration. Bodies remain contingent and open-ended.